Upcoming Events at the Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

January

Exceptional Courage: Righteous Gentiles during the Holocaust

Thursday, January 16 at 7 p.m.

Family Activity: Upstander Month

Saturday, January 18 at 2 p.m.

Film Screening: Sustainable Nation

Sunday, January 19 at 4 p.m.

Lunch and Learn: Art in the Holocaust

Tuesday, January 21 at 12 p.m.


February

Black History Month Film Series:

· Olympic Pride, American Prejudice - Sunday, February 2 at 4 p.m.

· 42 - Sunday, February 9 at 4 p.m.

· Selma - Sunday, February 16 at 4 p.m.

Family Activity: Black History Month

Saturday, February 8 at 2 p.m.

Mittelman-Berman Lecture - Dr. Omer Bartov: The Anatomy of a Genocide

Thursday, February 13 at 7 p.m.

Special Exhibition Opening: The Fight for Civil Rights in the South

Wednesday, February 19 at 7 p.m.

Funk Family Upstander Speaker Series: Sivan Ya’ari

Thursday, February 27 | 6 p.m. VIP Reception, 7 p.m. Program


March

Women’s History Month Film Series:

· Suffragette - Sunday, March 1 at 4 p.m.

· A League of Their Own - Sunday, March 8 at 4 p.m.

· Hidden Figures - Sunday, March 15 at 4 p.m.

· On the Basis of Sex - Sunday, March 22 at 4 p.m.

· The Post - Sunday, March 29 at 4 p.m.

Family Activity: Women’s Rights

Saturday, March 7 at 2 p.m.

Panel Discussion: Suffrage for All?

Thursday, March 12 at 7 p.m.



Event Opportunities

Lunch and Learn Series

The Museum’s Lunch & Learn Series features quarterly programs on Holocaust history and human rights topics.

Art in the Holocaust, Tuesday, January 21 at 12 p.m.

Under inhumane conditions and in utmost secrecy, art was created during the Holocaust. Despite unimaginable circumstances, professional and amateur artists still felt compelled to create. Julie Meetal Berman, artist and second generation Holocaust Survivor, will present works of art that were created between 1939 and 1945 as a declaration of the unshakeable human spirit that refuses to surrender.


Family Activities

Join us for monthly family-friendly activities focused around a particular theme. All ages welcome, and activities are free to attend.

Dates and Themes:

- Upstander Month - Saturday, January 18 at 2 p.m.

- Black History Month - Saturday, February 8 at 2 p.m.

- Women’s Rights - Saturday March 7 at 2 p.m.

- Genocide Awareness Month - Saturday, April 11 at 2 p.m.

- Asian Pacific American Heritage Month - Saturday, May 9 at 2 p.m.

- LGBTQ Rights - Saturday, June 13 at 2 p.m.


Film Screenings

The Museum will host a film screening every third Sunday of the month. February and March will feature weekly film screenings in honor of Black History Month and Women’s History Month.


- Sustainable Nation, Sunday, January 19 at 4 p.m.

Sustainable Nation follows three individuals who are doing their part to bring sustainable water solutions to an increasingly thirsty planet. Using solutions developed in water-poor Israel, they are working to change the status quo of a world where one in 10 people lacks access to safe drinking water. The film features the story of Sivan Ya’ari, our February Upstander Speaker.


- Black History Month Film Series

- Olympic Pride, American Prejudice, Sunday, February 2 at 4 p.m.

- 42, Sunday, February 9 at 4 p.m.

- Selma, Sunday, February 16 at 4 p.m.


- Women’s History Month Film Series

- Suffragette, Sunday, March 1 at 4 p.m.

- A League of Their Own, Sunday, March 8 at 4 p.m.

- Hidden Figures, Sunday, March 15 at 4 p.m.

- On the Basis of Sex, Sunday, March 22 at 4 p.m.

- The Post, Sunday, March 29 at 4 p.m.


Exceptional Courage: Righteous Gentiles during the Holocaust

Part of our Permanent Exhibition Highlight Series

Thursday, January 16

7 p.m.

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

During the Holocaust, a small number of people stood up and rescued Jews from persecution. These extraordinary people were ultimately honored as Righteous Among the Nations. Hear stories about these Holocaust Upstanders from those closest to them. Panelists include Klaus Driessen, son of Mati Driessen, Pastor Chris Edmonds, son of Roddie Edmonds, and Renata Kessler, daughter of Fryderyka and Edmund Kessler, who were hidden by the Kalwinski family.


Mittelman-Berman Lecture: Dr. Omer Bartov: Anatomy of a Genocide

Thursday, February 13

7 p.m.

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

Dr. Omer Bartov, John P. Birkelund Distinguished Professor of European History at Brown University, will speak about the anatomy of a genocide, the focus of his most recent book about the town of Buczacz, Ukraine during the Holocaust. Bartov will expand upon the idea that ethnic cleansing most often happens slowly and is perpetrated not by sociopaths, but by friends and neighbors.

Generously supported by Julie Meetal Berman and Dr. Joseph M. Berman, MD, in memory of Magda and Les Mittelman.


Upstander Speaker Series: Sivan Ya’ari

Thursday, February 27

6 p.m. VIP Reception | 7 p.m. Program

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

Sivan Ya’ari is the Founder and CEO of Innovation: Africa, a New York-based nonprofit that brings Israeli solar, agricultural, and water technologies to African villages. Through Ya’ari’s work with Innovation Africa over the past 10 years, over 1,000,000 lives in Africa have been impacted.


Panel Discussion: Suffrage for All?

Part of the Permanent Exhibition Highlight Series

Thursday, March 12

7 p.m.

Dallas Holocaust and Human Rights Museum

In honor of Women’s History Month, join us for a panel on the women’s suffrage movement in the United States, with a focus on the unique and unequal challenges and outcomes for women of color.


Special Exhibition – The Fight for Civil Rights in the South

Wednesday, February 19 – Tuesday, June 30, 2020

The Fight for Civil Rights in the South features two prestigious photography exhibitions covering the struggle for African American civil rights and social equality in the 1960s – Selma to Montgomery: Photographs by Spider Martin and Courage Under Fire: The 1961 Burning of the Freedom Riders Bus.


In Selma to Montgomery, photographer James “Spider” Martin captures the iconic march to Montgomery, Alabama in 1965, including the moment when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. led more than 2,000 marchers across the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Martin’s photos brought attention to the Civil Rights Movement and documented this nonviolent action that helped lead to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.


Courage Under Fire depicts a peaceful protest met with violence in Anniston, Alabama in 1961. Travelers known as Freedom Riders rode buses into the South to protest segregation on public transportation. On Sunday, May 14, 1961, the riders nearly died when their bus was set on fire by members of the Ku Klux Klan. Photographer John Postiglione brought national attention to the violent resistance to desegregation.


The exhibitions are curated and circulated by the Birmingham Civil Rights Institute (BCRI), with contributions from the City of Birmingham and to BCRI’s Corporate Campaign.

Community Partners for this special exhibition will also be recognized at the Exhibition Opening Reception on Wednesday, February 19 featuring a panel discussion on the fight for civil rights in different regions of the United States and in all other exhibition-related programming.


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Address

325 N. Saint Paul St.,
Suite 4200
Dallas, TX 75201

Contact

(214) 965-8400

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